The Safety Track provides a detailed understanding of kids’ safety issues for operators of virtual worlds, social networks, online games, mobile apps and products.  It also provides practical and usable techniques on how to create a safe online or mobile experience for child-aged users.  The Digital Kids Safety Track, which is produced by the kidSAFE® Seal Program, is the first-of-its-kind safety workshop for the kids’ industry.  

April 25, 2012 - Day 1

Location: Ballroom B

11:00 am - 12:00 pm: April 25, 2012 - Day 1
Filtering and Moderating Virtual Worlds and Online Communities
Increasingly, virtual worlds and other sites for kids are packed with interactive and social features, such as chat, in-game email, walls, message boards, profile pages, and blogs.  But how do you keep these areas safe and free of cyber dangers?  Come learn from the experts on what it takes to create a safe, yet engaging online environment for kids.  This session will give you practical guidance on how to implement automated chat filters, live/human moderation, user-reporting features, and other important safety measures.  It will also discuss the new COPPA rules applying to interactive communities and give you recommended procedures for the handling of safety issues and complaints. This session produced by the kidSAFE® Seal Program
1:00 pm - 1:30 pm: April 25, 2012 - Day 1
Educating Kids about Online Safety
Time and again, we hear the words “education is key” when it comes to online safety.  But how do you actually go about teaching kids to be safe online?  And how do you do so effectively?  This panel of experts will look at a variety of commonly-used techniques (e.g., codes of conduct, safety tips and information, parent-child safety contracts, rewards systems, scare tactics, etc.) and tell you what works and what doesn’t.  The experts will also offer tips on what information should be included within your educational materials, and who needs to get involved for your safety campaign to be successful. This session produced by the kidSAFE® Seal Program
1:30 pm - 2:00 pm: April 25, 2012 - Day 1
How Much Control Should Parents Have?
Should parents be able to limit their child’s play time? Change chat settings? Control spending? De-activate or delete their child’s account? These questions and more will be explored in a live demonstration of the most commonly-offered parental controls across a gamut of online services for kids, including game sites, virtual worlds/MMOs, social networks, e-mail and other web-related services. Also, find out which parental controls are useful versus useless, and which ones are legally required versus industry best practices. This session produced by the kidSAFE® Seal Program
2:30 pm - 3:30 pm: April 25, 2012 - Day 1
Is It Kid-Appropriate?
Content, Ads, Marketing, E-Commerce.  These are the things that can help you make money.  But these same things, if not handled properly, can also help derail your company’s reputation.  So how do you determine whether the content on your site is child-appropriate?  And which types of ads, promotions, and marketing practices are considered acceptable?  This panel of experts will delve into these issues, and in the end, leave you with clear markers on where to draw the line and how to strike the right balance. This session produced by the kidSAFE® Seal Program
3:45 pm - 4:45 pm: April 25, 2012 - Day 1
Safety and Privacy in Mobile Apps
The mobile space presents a unique set of safety and privacy concerns for children. Geo-location tracking, uploading and sharing of photos/videos, geo-tagging, in-app purchases, targeted mobile ads, and offer walls, just to name a few. Plus, new COPPA requirements could make compliance highly complex and impractical. In this panel, leading experts in the field will help you spot the risks and tell you what you need to know to develop kid-friendly apps on mobile platforms. The FTC and California AG’s office will also discuss their recent studies and enforcement actions in this area. This session produced by the kidSAFE® Seal Program
 

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